When you see this, you should be thinking one of 3 possible etiologies...

Cardinal sign of either a forefoot supinatus/forefoot varus or collapsing midfoot

I was hiking behind this young chap over the weekend along with my son and friends. Note the amount of calcaneal eversion present on the right side that is not present on the left. Also note the increased progression angle of the right foot and subtle circumduction of the extremity.

In my experience, you would generally see this much calcaneal diversion and one of three scenarios:

1. Moderate leg length discrepancy with the increased calcaneovalgus occurring on the longer leg side. This would support the amount of circumduction were seeing on the right side.

2. When there is a forefoot supinatus present and and inadequate range of motion available in the midfoot and/or forefoot. This is most likely the case here.

3. In moderate To severe midfoot collapse. This is clearly not the case as the medial aspect of the shoe is usually “blown out”.

Next time you see an everting rearfoot, think about these three possible etiologies.

Dr Ivo Waerlop, on of The Gait Guys

#evertedrrarfoot #calcanealvalgus #shortleg #forefootsupinatus #forefootvarus #gaitanalysis #thegaitguys

Sixth toe disease...That growth on the outside of your foot… Or on somebody’s foot is coming to see you…

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You know what we’re talking about. That extra growth on the lateral aspect of the foot that happens way too often and many of your clients. A Taylor’s bunion or sometimes referred to as a “bunionette”. 

What is the usual fix?

Usually in a ski boot or hiking boot, they blow out the lateral side of the shoe. This is usually not a good fix because most of these folks have internal tibial torsion and somewhat of a forefoot supinatus/varus.

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The internal tibial torsion places the knee outside the saggital plane and an arch support without a forefoot valgus post will just push it further out, creating a conflict at the knee. The forefoot supinatus and/or varus places them on the outside of the foot as well. Remember, most of these folks are ALREADY on the outside of the foot and the foot wants to migrate laterally...so creating more space just means it migrates farther. Good thought, doesn’t work that way.

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So what did we do?

  • We created a valgus post for the forefoot (see picture above) tapering from lateral to medial and to help “push“ the distal aspect of the first ray down (because there was motion available that was not being used)

  • We gave him exercises to help descend the first ray like the extensor hallucis brevis exercise, toe waving as well as peroneus longus exercises

  • We gave him plenty of balance and coordination work

    Dr Ivo Waerlop, one of The Gait Guys




#6thtoe #internaltibialtorsion #forefootvarus # forefootsupinatus #gaitanalysis #thegaitguys







Podcast 69: Advanced Arm Swing Concepts, Compensation Patterns and more

Plus: Foot Arch Pathomechanics, Knee Pivot Shift and Sesamoiditis and more !

A. Link to our server: 

http://traffic.libsyn.com/thegaitguys/pod_70ff.mp3

Direct Download: http://thegaitguys.libsyn.com/podcast-70

Permalink: 

B. iTunes link:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-gait-guys-podcast/id559864138

C. Gait Guys online /download store (National Shoe Fit Certification and more !) :

http://store.payloadz.com/results/results.aspx?m=80204

D. other web based Gait Guys lectures:

www.onlinece.com   type in Dr. Waerlop or Dr. Allen,  ”Biomechanics”

______________

Today’s Show notes:

1. “Compensation depends on the interplay of multiple factors: The availability of a compensatory response, the cost of compensation, and the stability of the system being perturbed.”
What happens when we change the length of one leg? How do we compensate? Here is a look at the short term consequences of a newly acquired leg length difference.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24857934
2. Medial Longitudinal Arch Mechanics Before and After a 45 Minute Run
http://www.japmaonline.org/doi/abs/10.7547/12-106.1

3. Several months ago we talked about the pivot-shift phenomenon. It is frequently missed clinically because it can be a tricky hands on assessment of the knee joint. In this article “ACL-deficient patients adopted the … .* Remember: what you see in their gait is not their problem, it is their strategy around their problem.
http://www.clinbiomech.com/article/S0268-0033(10)00264-0/abstract

4.Do you know the difference between a forefoot supinatus and a forefoot varus?
"A forefoot varus differs from forefoot supinatus in that a forefoot varus is a congenital osseous deformity that induces subtalar joint pronation, whereas forefoot supinatus is acquired and develops because of subtalar joint pronation. ”
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980930

5. Pubmed abstract link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24865637
Gait Posture. 2014 Jun;40(2):321-6. Epub 2014 May 6.
Arm swing in human walking: What is their drive?
Goudriaan M, Jonkers I, van Dieen JH, Bruijn SM

6. This is Your Brain On Guitar
http://www.the-open-mind.com/this-is-your-brain-on-guitar/