Population Insights on Hallux Valgus: “When the big toe heads West”. (thanks to Emily Delzell and LER for their ongoing great work.) Handicapping Hallux Valgus: Predictive variables include race, age    By Emily Delzell here are some of the study findings right from the article……. “In nonobese individuals, African Americans were almost two times more likely than whites to have hallux valgus. But in obese participants, prevalence was just as high in whites as in African Americans. This difference seen in the non-obese suggests a real racial difference,” said Golightly, the study’s lead author. Past high heel use increased HV risk by 22%. Investigators defined past use as participants’ self-reported primary shoe type during 10-year periods beginning when individuals were aged 20 years.“We found what we expected, that past—but not current—high heel use was predictive of hallux valgus. Women reported wearing high heels the most when they were aged 20 to 29, and high heel use diminished each decade until people reached 60, when wear really plummeted. It makes sense that people with hallux valgus and foot pain are uncomfortable in heels and are less likely to be current wearers,” Hannan said. The study showed that HV heritability overall was 39% for women and 38% for men (mean age 66 years, age range 39-99 years), but was significantly increased in the subset of participants younger than 60 years (HV heritability, 89%). “We know that genes for obesity are also highly heritable and it could be that the gene for hallux valgus is linked to obesity genes,” Hannan said. Get the full study from LER here (CLICK)

Population Insights on Hallux Valgus: “When the big toe heads West”.

(thanks to Emily Delzell and LER for their ongoing great work.)

Handicapping Hallux Valgus: Predictive variables include race, age    By Emily Delzell

here are some of the study findings right from the article…….

  1. “In nonobese individuals, African Americans were almost two times more likely than whites to have hallux valgus. But in obese participants, prevalence was just as high in whites as in African Americans. This difference seen in the non-obese suggests a real racial difference,” said Golightly, the study’s lead author.
  2. Past high heel use increased HV risk by 22%. Investigators defined past use as participants’ self-reported primary shoe type during 10-year periods beginning when individuals were aged 20 years.“We found what we expected, that past—but not current—high heel use was predictive of hallux valgus. Women reported wearing high heels the most when they were aged 20 to 29, and high heel use diminished each decade until people reached 60, when wear really plummeted. It makes sense that people with hallux valgus and foot pain are uncomfortable in heels and are less likely to be current wearers,” Hannan said.
  3. The study showed that HV heritability overall was 39% for women and 38% for men (mean age 66 years, age range 39-99 years), but was significantly increased in the subset of participants younger than 60 years (HV heritability, 89%).

    “We know that genes for obesity are also highly heritable and it could be that the gene for hallux valgus is linked to obesity genes,” Hannan said.

Get the full study from LER here (CLICK)