How quickly does your brain start working when you start your client evaluation ?   Answer: as quickly as possible. Stepping up to the plate today for the first pitch I see this.   Do you see the ever so slight evidence of “possible” right toe extensor tone ? It is subtle but it is staring you right in the face if you care to embrace the subtle clue.  From this angle you can see more of the fat pad and plantar aspect of the RIGHT forefoot. The very next thing we did was look at the dorsum of the foot, and yup, more prominent extensor tone, short extensors to be specific.  The next question was why was I seeing this ? Short flexors usually pair with long toe flexors, and that means gripping the ground and distal displacement of the fat pad and even sometimes lumbrical inhibition or frank weakness. Possible attempts to gain more foot purchase on the ground ? Hmmmmm, perhaps.  The client had right hip pain and right lateral sesamoid pain.  Time for an examination to find out the “whys” and then fix things. The powers of observation should always get your clinical juices flowing. Even the smallest of things should help guide you or at least clue you in to things.

How quickly does your brain start working when you start your client evaluation ?  

Answer: as quickly as possible.

Stepping up to the plate today for the first pitch I see this.  

Do you see the ever so slight evidence of “possible” right toe extensor tone ? It is subtle but it is staring you right in the face if you care to embrace the subtle clue.  From this angle you can see more of the fat pad and plantar aspect of the RIGHT forefoot. The very next thing we did was look at the dorsum of the foot, and yup, more prominent extensor tone, short extensors to be specific.  The next question was why was I seeing this ? Short flexors usually pair with long toe flexors, and that means gripping the ground and distal displacement of the fat pad and even sometimes lumbrical inhibition or frank weakness. Possible attempts to gain more foot purchase on the ground ? Hmmmmm, perhaps.  The client had right hip pain and right lateral sesamoid pain.  Time for an examination to find out the “whys” and then fix things.

The powers of observation should always get your clinical juices flowing. Even the smallest of things should help guide you or at least clue you in to things.