Whoa! Dangerous shoes ahead....

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Holy smokes ! Can you believe this?

Take a look at these BRAND NEW, just out of the box pair of Brooks Cadence shoes. We do not usually see many manufacturer defects from this brand. Looks like someone might have been asleep at the “upper goes on the midsole” machine

Check out the varus cant to the rearfoot of the right shoe. Now look at the forefoot valgus cant to the left shoe. This would not be a great shoe for someone who has too much rear foot eversion and midfoot pronation on the right and and uncompensated forefoot valgus on the left, but we do not think it was designed for that specific, small niche market.

Think of the biomechanical implications on a "neutral" foot. Placing the right rear foot in varus would effectively halt or slow pronation in the rear foot and midfoot of that foot. This could be a good thing for an over pronator but, in a neutral foot, this would cause them to toe off in supination on that side resulting in low gear push off and biomechanical insufficiency, not to mention the increased external rotation of the lower extremity and lack of shock absorption from 1 of the 4 mechanisms of shock absorption left (mid foot pronation, ankle dorsiflexion, knee flexion, thumb flexion, contralateral drop of the pelvis). Now, imagine if that same person had internal tibial torsion. Talk about placing the knee outside of the sagittal plane ! Can you say macerated meniscus?

And now the left shoe. Look at the valgus cant! If you had and uncompensated forefoot valgus, where the forefoot is everted with respect to the rear foot or a forefoot varus, where they had adequate range of motion to allow the first ray to descend, then this could be a good thing, otherwise they are toeing off in too much pronation. This could be a real problem for a midfoot pronator or someone with large amounts of external tibial torsion, because they commonly toe off in too much pronation and low gear to begin with, as this shoe would accelerate pronation from midfoot to the forefoot

The bottom line? Look at your patients/clients shoes, as well as your own before purchasing them and examined for manufacturer defects. The upper should sit squarely on the midsole and the shoe should not rock or tip from side to side.

TGG

Shoe causing knee pain? You decide… 

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This gentleman presented with left-sided knee pain at the medial collateral ligament. His left foot was planted when he rotated to the left. Take a close look at the shoes in the picture. If you look closely, you will notice the right shoe is tilted on its axis due to a rear foot to forefoot deformity (forefoot supinatus)and the left shoe upper was assembled canted on its axis, Most likely in manufacturing defect. Can you see the subtle valgus in the left shoe rearfoot?

Think of the implications of a shoe with this orientation. Putting the rearfoot in valgus “prepronates“ the foot, causing medial rotation of the tibia and femur and increase valgus stress on the knee, stressing the medial collateral ligament and stabilizing complex. This will most likely manifest itself as anterior rotation of the ilium on the left-hand side with relative posterior rotation on the right and a clockwise Pelvic distortion pattern. With the foot planted on the left side and it being pre-pronated, can you see how the rotation to the left leaves a greater amount of external rotation that must occur to just get the foot to neutral, never mind supination for stability and pushoff?
What about the popliteus having to work on time to assist and extra rotation and the appropriate femoral/tibial rotation ratios to spare the medial meniscus?

These are the kind of things to keep us awake at night…

And why does this guy have hip pain?

line up the center of the heel counters with the outsoles, and what do you see?

line up the center of the heel counters with the outsoles, and what do you see?

can you see how the heel counter is centered on the outsole, like it is supposed to be

can you see how the heel counter is centered on the outsole, like it is supposed to be

notice how the heel counter of the shoe is canted medially on the outsole of the shoe, creating a varus cant

notice how the heel counter of the shoe is canted medially on the outsole of the shoe, creating a varus cant

Take a guy with lower back and left sided sub patellar pain that also has a left anatomically short leg (tibial) and bilateral internal tibial torsion and put him in these baby’s to play pickleball and you have a prescription for disaster.

Folks with an LLD generally (soft rule here) have a tendency to supinate more on the short leg side (in an attempt to make the limb longer) and pronate more on the longer leg side (to make the limb shorter). Supination causes external rotation of the lower limb (remember, we are trying to make the foot into a rigid lever in a “normal” gait cycle). this external rotation with rotate the knee externally (laterally). Folks with internal tibial torsion usually rotate their limb externally to give them a better progression angle (of the foot) so they don’t trip and fall from having their feet pointing inward. This ALSO moves the knee into external rotation (laterally), often moving it OUTSIDE the saggital plane. In this case, the knee, because of the difference in leg length AND internal tibial torsion AND the varus cant of the shoe, has his knee WAY OUTSIDE the saggital plane, causing faulty patellar tracking and LBP.

Moral of the story? When people present with a problem ALWAYS TAKE TIME TO LOOK AT THEIR SHOES!