Another IFGEC Certified Doc!  
 Here is what Dr Brad Hochstein has to say about the National Shoe Fit Certification Program. 
  “Taking the National Shoe Fit Certification course has introduced me to many things that I didn’t take into consideration when working with my patients. The depth of information introduced is very helpful and presented more clearly than other courses I have taken in the past. I have studied a lot of the concepts that are introduced through the program in the past but struggled to put everything together. This certification did just that for me. It has helped me to link things together and look “outside the box” more than I had in the past.   
   I am a chiropractor with an extensive functional/biomechanics background and this has added another level of depth to my practice assessment and treatment. I am excited to incorporate the knowledge I   have gained through this certification into my practice to give my patients an even better experience!”  
 Is it time to up your knowledge base and separate yourself from other clinicians, coaches, trainers, therapists and retailers? 
  Want to know more? Email us at : thegaitguys@gmail.com

Another IFGEC Certified Doc!

Here is what Dr Brad Hochstein has to say about the National Shoe Fit Certification Program.

“Taking the National Shoe Fit Certification course has introduced me to many things that I didn’t take into consideration when working with my patients. The depth of information introduced is very helpful and presented more clearly than other courses I have taken in the past. I have studied a lot of the concepts that are introduced through the program in the past but struggled to put everything together. This certification did just that for me. It has helped me to link things together and look “outside the box” more than I had in the past.


I am a chiropractor with an extensive functional/biomechanics background and this has added another level of depth to my practice assessment and treatment. I am excited to incorporate the knowledge I have gained through this certification into my practice to give my patients an even better experience!”

Is it time to up your knowledge base and separate yourself from other clinicians, coaches, trainers, therapists and retailers?

Want to know more? Email us at : thegaitguys@gmail.com

tumblr_n1tmnxBbA21qhko2so1_1280.jpg
tumblr_n1tmnxBbA21qhko2so2_1280.jpg

Congrats to Coach Cameron! Our 1st Certification in Germany!

Here is what this coach has to say about the IFGEC Certification program:

“I found the National Shoe Fit Program very informative. So much information was presented in a short amount of time, and I have learned a huge amount. Without being able to stop to write and go back to check I had the information clear in my head I would have only taken away a very small amount of the detail required to start to get my head around this subject.

I am a coach, personal trainer and an athlete and will be using this within my coaching here in Germany. After buying so many shoes and seeing Doctors in the past about problems had with running I am amazed that not one person had gone into the detail and really looked at my feet in the way they should have been. I now believe I have been given a short cut to all the basic information and now have a solid platform on with to build more biomechanical information.

Thank you for the course.

Regards Cameron Lamont”

Want to know more? Contact us at: thegaitguys@gmail.com

tumblr_mo8dnmvLAB1qhko2so1_1280.jpg
tumblr_mo8dnmvLAB1qhko2so2_1280.jpg

So, what kind of shoes do I put this guy in?


The answer is, well…it depends.

This gentleman has a large Q angle (need to know more about Q angles? click here). The second photo is taken from above looking down at his knee.


If he has medial (inside) knee pain (possibly from shear forces), you would want to unload the medial knee, so a more flexible shoe that would allow more pronation of the foot and INCREASE the amount of valgus would open the medial joint space and probably be more appropriate.

If he had lateral (outside) knee pain (possibly from compressive forces), then a shoe with more support (like a motion control shoe) would help to unload the lateral knee and create more space may be appropriate. And that just covers the local knee issue. What if he has a pes planus and needs more than a “more stable” shoe ? And, what if that pes planus is rigid and won’t accept a more rigid arch supporting device ? What are you gonna do then ?

The caveat?

There are no hard and fast rules AND there is no substitute for examining the person and asking LOTS of questions BEFORE putting them in a shoe. You must approach each case on a case-by-case basis with all factors brought into the fold to make the best clinical decision.  Simply watching them walk, as you have heard it over and over again here on The Gait Guys, will lead you into wrong assumptions much of the time. Sometimes the obvious fix is not possible or won’t be tolerated by the person’s foot, knee, hip or body.  So, sometimes you have to settle with something in-between. 

Need to, or dying to, know more? Take our 3 part National Shoe Fit Program and be a shoe guru!

Email us at thegaitguys@gmail.com for details.

tumblr_mnhlb3fJxj1qhko2so1_1280.jpg
tumblr_mnhlb3fJxj1qhko2so2_1280.jpg
tumblr_mnhlb3fJxj1qhko2so3_1280.jpg

Take a  look at these dogs

Take a good look at these shoes. Notice the wear at the heel counter. Did you notice the varus cant  of the rear foot. Good! Did you carefully inspect where the upper was attached to the midsole? Now did you notice that upper is canted in varus as well? This person DID NOT have a rear (or forefoot) varus.

Hmmm. Maybe the varus canting of the upper caused the wear on the outsole? We doubt it; most likely it was the other way around.

What sort of  symptoms so you think they had?

Do you think medial or lateral knee pain?

 Could be either.

  • Lateral; knee pain from stretch on the lateral side of the knee at the lateral collateral ligament or
  • medial from compression of the medial condle of the femur and medial tiibial plateau.

Anything else?

How about pain on the outside of the hip? Canting the foot laterally has a tendency to externally rotate the lower leg and thigh. This may cause shortening of the gluteals (max and post fibers of the min); difficulty accessing the gluteus minimus (its a medial rotator), shortening of the deep 6 external rotators, difficulty accessing the vastus medialis (external rotator when foot is on the ground), and the list goes on.

What’s the fix?

New shoes. Pay attention when you buy shoes. Put them up on a counter at eye level and inspet them closely. We can’t tell you how many defects we see on a daily basis; too many to count. One time at a shop, we needed to go through 10 pair before we had a good right and left.

The Gait Guys. Bald. Good looking. Smart. Increasing your “Shoe IQ” every day.

 Want to  know more? Take our National Shoe Fit Certification Program. It’s the only one of its type and the only one certified by the International Footwear and Gait Education Council. Drop us an email at: thegaitguys@gmail.com for more details or go to our payloadz store  (click here) and download it today.

All material copyright 2013 The Gait Guys/ The Homunculus Group.

Another IFGEC Certification Granted  

  “With more than 2 decades in the fitness industry, and a MS in Exercise Physiology, I’ve learned that there is so little that I really know.  I am constantly looking to improve what I can do to help the triathletes and runners that I see.   As an endurance coach and clinician that focuses on preventing injuries, optimizing performance, and avoiding reoccurring injuries, the IFGEC Shoe Fit Certification is going to be a keystone (much like the Navicular Bone) to my screening process of athletes and clients.  Making sure they are fitted properly in shoes, working with their movement patterns, teaching them running form skills, and then building on all aspects from there.  What I have learned from "The Gait Guys” has already made an impact on what I do, but it’s at a whole new level now.  This is not just a “online course”  this is real education that stays with you for life.  This is a true Ground Up approach to helping and is something that every running shoe store, coach, and medical professional that deals with runners and triathletes needs to learn.“  
  
  Ryan Smith, MS is owner of the Personal Impact, LLC and The Runners’ Clinic in the Cincinnati, Ohio area.  He is a USATF Level 1 Coach, Newton Natural Running Form Coach, & ACSM-CPT that works with runners and triathletes helping to prevent and recover from injuries that athletes deal with.  More information on Ryan Smith, visit his site at.   http://ryansmithfitness.com   
  
  
  Want to get certified or learn more? Email us at thegaitguy@gmail.com

Another IFGEC Certification Granted

“With more than 2 decades in the fitness industry, and a MS in Exercise Physiology, I’ve learned that there is so little that I really know.  I am constantly looking to improve what I can do to help the triathletes and runners that I see.   As an endurance coach and clinician that focuses on preventing injuries, optimizing performance, and avoiding reoccurring injuries, the IFGEC Shoe Fit Certification is going to be a keystone (much like the Navicular Bone) to my screening process of athletes and clients.  Making sure they are fitted properly in shoes, working with their movement patterns, teaching them running form skills, and then building on all aspects from there.  What I have learned from "The Gait Guys” has already made an impact on what I do, but it’s at a whole new level now.  This is not just a “online course”  this is real education that stays with you for life.  This is a true Ground Up approach to helping and is something that every running shoe store, coach, and medical professional that deals with runners and triathletes needs to learn.“
Ryan Smith, MS is owner of the Personal Impact, LLC and The Runners’ Clinic in the Cincinnati, Ohio area.  He is a USATF Level 1 Coach, Newton Natural Running Form Coach, & ACSM-CPT that works with runners and triathletes helping to prevent and recover from injuries that athletes deal with.  More information on Ryan Smith, visit his site at.  http://ryansmithfitness.com
Want to get certified or learn more? Email us at thegaitguy@gmail.com
tumblr_mee1niiIs01qhko2so1_1280.jpg
tumblr_mee1niiIs01qhko2so2_1280.jpg
tumblr_mee1niiIs01qhko2so3_1280.jpg

Shoe News You can Use…

The Heel Counter- the back of the upper

This is the back of the shoe that offers structure (just squeeze the back of a shoe. this is the rigid part you feel between your thumb and 1st finger, unless of course, you are using your teeth). This is often part of or integrated with the upper.

A strong, deep heel counter with medial and lateral support is important for motion control; It offers something for the calcaneus (heel bone) to bump up against when as it is everting (moving laterally) during pronation. Look at folks that have a bump on the outside of their heel (particularly the ladies(sorry, true); this is often called a “pump bump”). Now look at the inside of their shoes. See that worn away area on the inside of the back of the shoe? Now you know where that worn away area is coming from!

Lateral support especially for people who invert a great deal or when you’re going to place an orthotic in the shoe which inverts the foot a great deal.  The lateral counter provides the foot (or orthotic) something to give resistance against.  The lateral counter needs to extend at least to the base of the fifth metatarsal, otherwise it can affect the foot during propulsion. A deep heel pocket in the shoe helps to limit the motion of the calcaneus and will also allow space for an orthotic. The heel counter should also grip right above the calcaneus, hugging the Achilles tendon.

We know you want to know more. We can help. Take the National Shoe Fit Certification Program. If you like, sit for the exam and get certified as well. Email us for details thegaitguys@gmail.com

The Gait Guys. We’re your heel counter!


all material copyright 2012 The Homunculus Group/ The Gait Guys. All rights reserved. If you want to use our stuff, please ask. If not, Captain Cunieform may pay you a visit…

tumblr_mekfl3JSiq1qhko2so1_1280.jpg
tumblr_mekfl3JSiq1qhko2so2_1280.jpg

The Great Myth of Rotating your Shoes : Here are the Actual Facts as we see them.

Everyone has heard the rules, rotate into new shoes about every 400-500 miles.  We disagree, kind of, and we have talked about it on previous blog posts in the past and on our podcasts.  Many shoe reps have agreed with the methods we employ for our runners.

The EVA foam often used in shoe manufacturing has a lifespan, or better put, a given number of compression and shear cycles. It can go through a rather fixed number of compression cycles before it loses its original structural properties, the older the foam gets the faster the degradation process and the more risks it poses for runners.  It is known that EVA foam compressed into a focal vector or area over and over again becomes softer and more giving into that vector/area over time.  Hence, if you have a compensation pattern or a known foot type (forefoot varus, forefoot valgus, rearfoot varus, rearfoot valgus or a combination of these 4) you will break down a certain region or zone of the shoe’s EVA foam. For example a forefoot varus foot type will often drive some heavy focal compression into the foam under the first metatarsal. However, if you combine it with a rear foot valgus it will drive shear forces and compression into the  EVA foam along the entire medial aspect of the shoe (see the 2 pictures attached, you can see the evidence of excessive medial compression and medial shear in a foot that has severe rearfoot valgus and forefoot varus. This is a very poor shoe prescription for the foot type involved).

Here is what you need to do / know:

1- Know your athletes foot type so you can make more informed decisions.

2- Know the type of foam of the shoes you are recommending (ie. Altra uses A-Bound foam instead of EVA just as an example. A-Bound is an environmentally friendly energy-return compound is made of recycled materials. It reduces the impact of hard surfaces while still maintaining ground feedback. Traditional running shoe foam compresses 70-90% while A-Bound™ compresses 2-3x less so it won’t deform over time.).  Cheap shoes use cheap materials.  Altra goes the extra mile for foam quality and many others are beginning to follow suit. If you think you are getting a deal on shoes, know what “the deal” is, it just may be cheaper materials.

3-  500 miles is not the rule for everyone and every shoe.  If you have a relatively neutral forefoot and you are a forefoot or midfoot strike runner you will get far more miles out of a shoe.  If you depend on a stability shoe with dual densities of foam to slow your pronation and control your medial foot because of a rearfoot valgus and/or forefoot varus know that the shoe’s foam will break down less uniformly because of foam interface junctions and whatnot.  This is a science. Engineers call it “the mechanics of material deformation”.  We wonder how many mechanical engineers shoe companies have on board in their R&D divisions ?  We know for a fact that a few do not. There was a reason we snuck quietly into the mechanical engineering departments of our Alma Mater and sat quietly in the “Materials” classes. At the time our roommates just told us it was  cool class, little did we know why it was so interesting to us, until now.

4- Here is what we recommend. Fit the foot type to the right shoe selection. If you are weak in this territory consider taking our intense “National Shoe Fit” program. Fit is everything. Make the wrong choice for your client and the shoes will break down quicker and into poor and risky patterns. Make the right choice and be their hero. If you are looking for a way to improve clientele happiness and store loyalty our Shoe Fit Program is the way. Just read the testimonials here on our blog. Some of the top stores in the Nation have quietly taken the National Shoe Fit Program from us, they have good reason to. They also have good reason to keep it quiet, to get the edge on the competition.

You can email us to get this information and the e-file program download. Why not certify your entire store staff ?

Email us at   thegaitguys@gmail.com.  This program will teach you foot anatomy, functional anatomy, shoe anatomy, foot types and matching foot type to shoe type as well as many other aspects of gait and lower limb biomechanics.

* 5- Try this recommendation.  At 250 miles buy a new shoe to accompany your shoe that already has 250 miles. Now you are rotating 2 shoes. From this 250 mile point moving forward, alternate the newer show with the older shoe. This way you are never in a shoe that is notably more deformed in a specific area of the EVA foam because of your compensations, limitations or foot type. Essentially you are always just a day away from a newer shoe that has less driving force into abnormally compressed EVA foam.  The older the shoe gets the more it accelerates your foot and body into that deformation and hence why many injuries occur as their shoes get older. Continue to alternate shoes on every other run (new, old, new, old).  Once you hit 400-500 miles on the old shoes, ditch them and get a new pair again to restore the cycle once again.  In fact, to be specific here is what we recommend. Monday, old shoe. Tuesday, new shoe. Wednesday do not run, rather, rest or cross train. Thursday go back to the older shoe. Friday new shoe and repeat. This way you are 4 days between runs in the older more deformed shoe. The one day off running in mid week gives tissues that were challenged by the “old shoe run” a bit more time to repair.

6- Dedicate your shoes to running only. Running gait is not the same as walking gait. Why would you want to break down the EVA foam at the rear foot during walking (because heel strike is normal in walking) when in running you are a mid-forefoot striker ?  Keep walking shoes for walking, running shoes for running. Otherwise you are just asking for trouble.

Check out our National Shoe Fit program and certification process here as well as links to our other teaching DVD’s & e-downloads:
 http://store.payloadz.com/results/results.asp?m=80204

Shawn and Ivo. Helping you use your head (and shoe knowledge) better everyday.
The Gait Guys  (have you checked out our RebelMouse page ? https://www.rebelmouse.com/TheGaitGuys/

Keeping up with our awesome informative podcasts ? It is all free stuff ! https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-gait-guys-podcast/id559864138

How about our youtube channel ? http://www.youtube.com/user/thegaitguys

How about our Facebook PAGE ?  https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Gait-Guys/169366033103080

The Dual Density Foam Running Shoe.  
 This goes along nicely with  yesterdays post . Note the photo attached. This is a great example of something we all see everyday. A laterally tipped foot in a stability shoe.  Clearly a shoe that has been mis-prescribed for the wrong reason. Or has it ? 
 This client is clearly tipped laterally in the shoe, forcing supination.  Did this client self fit the shoe themselves in a discount store ? Were they fitted in a retail running store ? Where did things go wrong ? Or did they ?  The initial knee jerk reaction is to say this is the wrong shoe for this client.  Lets go a little deeper and ask some harder questions and see if you are considering some alternatives. 
 The assumption is frequently one of, “you are a hyperpronator so you need a stability shoe”.  In this case is this person a hyperpronator ?    There is no way to know, not in the shoe.  On initial knee jerk observation this looks like a supinator in a stability shoe, a poor match.  But read on …    
 1. What if this person has significant flat feet, pes planus with severe pronation problems, but they find the stability they need by standing on the outer edge of the foot in the mechanically locked out position (supination).  Perhaps this is a less fatiguing posture, perhaps a less painful posture. This is often a comfort thing for hyperpronators to display.  What you see is not always what you get because there are two types of feet, those that drop or collapse into the weakness and those that fight the collapse and weakness the whole way via an alternative compensation.  You cannot tell by looking, certainly not from this picture of someone in a shoe.   There must be a functional assessment and some gait evaluation.    
 2. There exists the high arched flexible foot that pronates excessively, quickly and for a long time (this is the flexible cavus foot) and then there is the high arched rigid foot (the equinovarus foot).  The first described foot may need support from a stability shoe even though they have a high arch on presentation/examination and the later described foot can often go right into a neutral non-supportive shoe.   Can you tell either of these from this picture ?   No you cannot.  
 3. Maybe the person in the photo has tibial varum (bowed lower leg) combined with a rearfoot varus and forefoot varus. This could mean they pronate heavily through the midfoot-forefoot and less so through the rearfoot-midfoot. In this case they are still a heavy pronator but not through what is typically noted or detected by significant medial arch collapse.  In this case the dual density shoe is not going to help all that much because the pronation is occurring mostly after the bulk of the shoe’s dual density stability foam has been passed through by the foot.  Can this be detected by this photo ?   Again the answer is no.  The shoe fitter needs to be clinically aware that this type of client needs a forefoot varus posted shoe to help post up that medial tripod (1st metatarsal head). 
 4. Maybe, just maybe this is a typical rearfoot-midfoot pronating client,  excessive mind you , and all they need is some foot and gait retraining to break their old compensation pattern of lateral weight bearing (standing or walking) and with this correct shoe they can then engage a healthier motor pattern.  
   Which is it ?   
 Do you know how to navigate your way through these issues to make the right decision ?  There is no way to know here without seeing the foot naked and moving across the floor, and with a clinical examination to boot. 
 You can get all these things through our National Shoe Fit Certification program found here. 
 LINK:     http://store.payloadz.com/results/results.aspx?advsearch=1&m=80204    
 Email us and we will share the necessary info to get you started.  thegaitguys@gmail.com 
 Shawn and Ivo, The Gait Guys

The Dual Density Foam Running Shoe.

This goes along nicely with yesterdays post. Note the photo attached. This is a great example of something we all see everyday. A laterally tipped foot in a stability shoe.  Clearly a shoe that has been mis-prescribed for the wrong reason. Or has it ?

This client is clearly tipped laterally in the shoe, forcing supination.  Did this client self fit the shoe themselves in a discount store ? Were they fitted in a retail running store ? Where did things go wrong ? Or did they ?  The initial knee jerk reaction is to say this is the wrong shoe for this client.  Lets go a little deeper and ask some harder questions and see if you are considering some alternatives.

The assumption is frequently one of, “you are a hyperpronator so you need a stability shoe”. In this case is this person a hyperpronator ?  There is no way to know, not in the shoe.  On initial knee jerk observation this looks like a supinator in a stability shoe, a poor match.  But read on …

1. What if this person has significant flat feet, pes planus with severe pronation problems, but they find the stability they need by standing on the outer edge of the foot in the mechanically locked out position (supination).  Perhaps this is a less fatiguing posture, perhaps a less painful posture. This is often a comfort thing for hyperpronators to display.  What you see is not always what you get because there are two types of feet, those that drop or collapse into the weakness and those that fight the collapse and weakness the whole way via an alternative compensation.  You cannot tell by looking, certainly not from this picture of someone in a shoe. There must be a functional assessment and some gait evaluation. 

2. There exists the high arched flexible foot that pronates excessively, quickly and for a long time (this is the flexible cavus foot) and then there is the high arched rigid foot (the equinovarus foot).  The first described foot may need support from a stability shoe even though they have a high arch on presentation/examination and the later described foot can often go right into a neutral non-supportive shoe.  Can you tell either of these from this picture ? No you cannot.

3. Maybe the person in the photo has tibial varum (bowed lower leg) combined with a rearfoot varus and forefoot varus. This could mean they pronate heavily through the midfoot-forefoot and less so through the rearfoot-midfoot. In this case they are still a heavy pronator but not through what is typically noted or detected by significant medial arch collapse.  In this case the dual density shoe is not going to help all that much because the pronation is occurring mostly after the bulk of the shoe’s dual density stability foam has been passed through by the foot. Can this be detected by this photo ? Again the answer is no. The shoe fitter needs to be clinically aware that this type of client needs a forefoot varus posted shoe to help post up that medial tripod (1st metatarsal head).

4. Maybe, just maybe this is a typical rearfoot-midfoot pronating client, excessive mind you, and all they need is some foot and gait retraining to break their old compensation pattern of lateral weight bearing (standing or walking) and with this correct shoe they can then engage a healthier motor pattern. 

Which is it ?

Do you know how to navigate your way through these issues to make the right decision ?  There is no way to know here without seeing the foot naked and moving across the floor, and with a clinical examination to boot.

You can get all these things through our National Shoe Fit Certification program found here.

LINK:  http://store.payloadz.com/results/results.aspx?advsearch=1&m=80204

Email us and we will share the necessary info to get you started.  thegaitguys@gmail.com

Shawn and Ivo, The Gait Guys

Certification. See what your peers are saying….  
  “The shoe fit certification program is a must for anyone who wants to take their knowledge base of shoes, foot types and how they interact to the next level. The program is detailed, thorough, and the test will make sure you know this cutting edge material.   
  If you are a doctor or therapist that treats foot or other lower extremities disorders, this information will help ensure the patients you treat are in the right shoe to assist them in their healing process and help prevent future problems.  If you are a shoe retailer, it will give you the confidence you are putting the right shoes on your customer’s feet to minimize complaints and unwanted returns.  The retail practice of simply looking at a customer’s feet while standing, asking them their shoe size, and pulling a shoe off the shelf has gone by the wayside in light of this new information.  
  If your profession involves shoes or feet, the information contained in this program is priceless!”  
  
      
 Ryan D. Hamm, D.C.
 Corrective Chiropractic Center 
 612 E. Golf Road 
 Arlington Heights, IL 60005 
  847.718.0071  
  www.correctivechiropracticcenter.com  
  Specializing in the Conservative Treatment of Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Spine and Extremities

Certification. See what your peers are saying….

“The shoe fit certification program is a must for anyone who wants to take their knowledge base of shoes, foot types and how they interact to the next level. The program is detailed, thorough, and the test will make sure you know this cutting edge material. 

If you are a doctor or therapist that treats foot or other lower extremities disorders, this information will help ensure the patients you treat are in the right shoe to assist them in their healing process and help prevent future problems.  If you are a shoe retailer, it will give you the confidence you are putting the right shoes on your customer’s feet to minimize complaints and unwanted returns.  The retail practice of simply looking at a customer’s feet while standing, asking them their shoe size, and pulling a shoe off the shelf has gone by the wayside in light of this new information.
If your profession involves shoes or feet, the information contained in this program is priceless!”
   
Ryan D. Hamm, D.C.
Corrective Chiropractic Center
612 E. Golf Road
Arlington Heights, IL 60005
Specializing in the Conservative Treatment of Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Spine and Extremities
Another IFGEC Certification Granted!  
  “My name is Eric Johnson.  I’m a runner and triathlete, and manage a running store called Ultramax Sports in Springfield, MO.  I am a self-confessed exercise physiology nerd but don’t have an advanced degree in exercise science.  As a result, I’m always reading and trying to learn more.  My fascination with running, shoes, and injuries also stems from an extended bout of lower leg problems stemming from attempting to run through an injury in the early 2000’s.  I came across the Gait Guys’ tumblr blog one day and was instantly fascinated by the detailed descriptions of human gait abnormalities they wrote about but also how easy it was to apply to myself and my customers.    At our store, we pride ourselves on doing very thorough fittings, including detailed athlete history, foot and leg observations, video gait analysis, and trying on lots of shoes with close customer care.  We’ve been doing this fitting process since we opened in the late 2000’s and have built a very solid following based upon customer care and attention to detail.  We try to avoid the fads and base our process on scientifically valid methods.  Through my explorations over the past couple of years, it became apparent that some of the things we were doing were right and some were wrong.      I had the opportunity to watch Shawn and Ivo speak at the 2011 IRRA conference and was very excited when they announced the upcoming release of a shoe fitting certification.  It took a bit longer than expected, but it was well worth it.  The three Level I videos were very clear and easy to understand, and it was an easy shift to apply the concepts to our fitting process.  I took and passed the Level I exam today in fact, and am working on the first wave of changes our store will be implementing on our shoe fitting process.  My understanding of the anatomy and physiology of human gait is incredibly better now.  In fact, I was able to apply concepts from the videos to a customer the other day whom I would not have served as completely without that knowledge.  She had been fit at our store in the past, but commented that our level of knowledge really seemed to grow in the interim.  She loved learning about why her feet her and why certain shoes felt better.  She was also very grateful to learn exercises to help her particular condition.    This certification has the potential to greatly impact the running industry in a very positive way.  I wholeheartedly recommend all of you run specialty managers/owners/staff who want to provide a more complete and accurate experience for your customers to pursue this certification.  Customers will be more impressed with your level of knowledge and your returns will reduce.”   Gait Guys. Certified!   Get the edge!

Another IFGEC Certification Granted!

“My name is Eric Johnson.  I’m a runner and triathlete, and manage a running store called Ultramax Sports in Springfield, MO.  I am a self-confessed exercise physiology nerd but don’t have an advanced degree in exercise science.  As a result, I’m always reading and trying to learn more.  My fascination with running, shoes, and injuries also stems from an extended bout of lower leg problems stemming from attempting to run through an injury in the early 2000’s.  I came across the Gait Guys’ tumblr blog one day and was instantly fascinated by the detailed descriptions of human gait abnormalities they wrote about but also how easy it was to apply to myself and my customers.

At our store, we pride ourselves on doing very thorough fittings, including detailed athlete history, foot and leg observations, video gait analysis, and trying on lots of shoes with close customer care.  We’ve been doing this fitting process since we opened in the late 2000’s and have built a very solid following based upon customer care and attention to detail.  We try to avoid the fads and base our process on scientifically valid methods.  Through my explorations over the past couple of years, it became apparent that some of the things we were doing were right and some were wrong. 

I had the opportunity to watch Shawn and Ivo speak at the 2011 IRRA conference and was very excited when they announced the upcoming release of a shoe fitting certification.  It took a bit longer than expected, but it was well worth it.  The three Level I videos were very clear and easy to understand, and it was an easy shift to apply the concepts to our fitting process.  I took and passed the Level I exam today in fact, and am working on the first wave of changes our store will be implementing on our shoe fitting process.  My understanding of the anatomy and physiology of human gait is incredibly better now.  In fact, I was able to apply concepts from the videos to a customer the other day whom I would not have served as completely without that knowledge.  She had been fit at our store in the past, but commented that our level of knowledge really seemed to grow in the interim.  She loved learning about why her feet her and why certain shoes felt better.  She was also very grateful to learn exercises to help her particular condition.

This certification has the potential to greatly impact the running industry in a very positive way.  I wholeheartedly recommend all of you run specialty managers/owners/staff who want to provide a more complete and accurate experience for your customers to pursue this certification.  Customers will be more impressed with your level of knowledge and your returns will reduce.”

Gait Guys. Certified! Get the edge!

Another IFGEC Certified! Eric is our 1st non retail individual to pass the exam! 
 Some comments on the course an exam from Eric: 
  “ I was impressed by the depth of the material and your abilities to keep a highly complex subject like foot/ankle mechanics and shoe fit to only 3 hours. I have been to a full weekend course on the foot/ankle and didn’t leave with as much practical knowledge!  As for the exam, I noticed that some questions had a couple of layers to them that really ensured that the material presented needed to be understood by the participant.  I haven’t taken a test before where I received immediate feedback on whether I was right or wrong.  At times, I got a little too excited at knowing I was wrong, but for the most part that may help people take extra time to think their answers through.      As for studying, everyone is different.  I watched the video three times, took detailed notes and studied them.  Also, I’ve been an avid follower of the blog, facebook page and now podcast since I saw Dr. Allen present for the NSCA earlier this year at Chicago State University.    I am the manager for an outpatient orthopedic facility in Flossmoor, IL (southern suburb of Chicago).  The overwhelming majority of referrals are worker comp physical therapy and work conditioning patients.  I primarily took the course to answer my and my patient’s questions on proper shoe choice and since I’m not a runner, I really didn’t put much thought into shoes beyond "whatever feels comfortable."  I have much more confidence on what recommendations need to be made following this course.”  
  The Gait Guys. Stepping toward foot, gait and shoe competency, one individual at a time

Another IFGEC Certified! Eric is our 1st non retail individual to pass the exam!

Some comments on the course an exam from Eric:

“ I was impressed by the depth of the material and your abilities to keep a highly complex subject like foot/ankle mechanics and shoe fit to only 3 hours. I have been to a full weekend course on the foot/ankle and didn’t leave with as much practical knowledge!  As for the exam, I noticed that some questions had a couple of layers to them that really ensured that the material presented needed to be understood by the participant.  I haven’t taken a test before where I received immediate feedback on whether I was right or wrong.  At times, I got a little too excited at knowing I was wrong, but for the most part that may help people take extra time to think their answers through. 

As for studying, everyone is different.  I watched the video three times, took detailed notes and studied them.  Also, I’ve been an avid follower of the blog, facebook page and now podcast since I saw Dr. Allen present for the NSCA earlier this year at Chicago State University.

I am the manager for an outpatient orthopedic facility in Flossmoor, IL (southern suburb of Chicago).  The overwhelming majority of referrals are worker comp physical therapy and work conditioning patients.  I primarily took the course to answer my and my patient’s questions on proper shoe choice and since I’m not a runner, I really didn’t put much thought into shoes beyond "whatever feels comfortable."  I have much more confidence on what recommendations need to be made following this course.”

The Gait Guys. Stepping toward foot, gait and shoe competency, one individual at a time

Get Certified!  
 Our 2nd Nationally Certified Individual! Congratulations to Marianne Fitzgerald, LMT.   Marianne is the coordinator of “ all things shoes and sox” @ Summit Chiropractic  Rehabilitation, PC in Dillon, Colorado ( Dr Ivo’s office). 
 “The course was super informative and well structured.  It was great to be able to watch the videos online at my own pace and on my schedule.  I learn by repetition so I was able to watch each one a couple of times. .  The exam was challenging but no trick questions.  I wish I had taken better notes because I know that all the information on the test was in the video.  Now when I’m working with someone to try on shoes and hopefully buy them, I feel more confident and actually sound like I know what I’m talking about.” 
   The Gait Guys: spreading gait, foot and shoe competency, one pair at a time…

Get Certified!

Our 2nd Nationally Certified Individual! Congratulations to Marianne Fitzgerald, LMT.   Marianne is the coordinator of “ all things shoes and sox” @ Summit Chiropractic  Rehabilitation, PC in Dillon, Colorado ( Dr Ivo’s office).

“The course was super informative and well structured.  It was great to be able to watch the videos online at my own pace and on my schedule.  I learn by repetition so I was able to watch each one a couple of times. .  The exam was challenging but no trick questions.  I wish I had taken better notes because I know that all the information on the test was in the video.  Now when I’m working with someone to try on shoes and hopefully buy them, I feel more confident and actually sound like I know what I’m talking about.”

The Gait Guys: spreading gait, foot and shoe competency, one pair at a time…

Get Certified!   
  “In my experience, the Foot Wear Certification Series, is what is most needed by anyone in the position of helping an individual receive a more satisfying shoe fit experience.  Whether that is a simpler issue of finding the best athletic shoe to enhance their individual health goals, or to assess ones foot anatomy and the problem areas that can be hindering an individuals comfort and ability to function, the videos are informative and deeply educational.  The combined experience and knowledge of Drs. Ivo and Shawn Allen is so extensive, that it is the tool I would recommend for those of us in the industry.”   
 Our 1st IFGEC (International Foot & Gait Education Council) Certified Sales Associate. Congratulations to Julie Meyers; the nations 1st to be certified. Julie works for Dr Waerlop at Summit Chiropractic & Rehabilitation, PC in Dillon, Colorado. She is especially fond of Lemming shoes! 
 When asked about the exam, she said “Wow, it was really hard!” 
 Want to get certified? Stay tuned as the program is ramping up! 
 T he Gait Guys. Making gait and foot competency viral!

Get Certified!

“In my experience, the Foot Wear Certification Series, is what is most needed by anyone in the position of helping an individual receive a more satisfying shoe fit experience.  Whether that is a simpler issue of finding the best athletic shoe to enhance their individual health goals, or to assess ones foot anatomy and the problem areas that can be hindering an individuals comfort and ability to function, the videos are informative and deeply educational.  The combined experience and knowledge of Drs. Ivo and Shawn Allen is so extensive, that it is the tool I would recommend for those of us in the industry.”

Our 1st IFGEC (International Foot & Gait Education Council) Certified Sales Associate. Congratulations to Julie Meyers; the nations 1st to be certified. Julie works for Dr Waerlop at Summit Chiropractic & Rehabilitation, PC in Dillon, Colorado. She is especially fond of Lemming shoes!

When asked about the exam, she said “Wow, it was really hard!”

Want to get certified? Stay tuned as the program is ramping up!

The Gait Guys. Making gait and foot competency viral!