Premature heel rise: Part 2

VIDEO: an atypical case of Premature heel rise. A follow up video for yesterdays discussion on the topic.

You should easily see premature heel rise here in this video. We will discuss this case at length with other video projections on our Patreon site next week, if you wish to dive further.

But here you should see, lets focus on the right limb, premature heel rise (again, stick with just watching the right foot/leg). This is, in-part, because this person does not achieve adequate hip extension, you should clearly be able to see that. Loss of terminal hip extension means premature heel rise, no exceptions. Train your eye to see this, you do not need expensive video software to see this.

So, Why inadequate hip extension? Well, just look at the amount of right knee flexion going into terminal stance, it is still heavily flexed and this forces them to prematurely heel rise, avoiding terminal hip extension, and prematurely load the forefoot. Without a knee that extends sufficiently, the hip cannot extend sufficiently, and thus premature heel rise is inevitable. And, trying to solve this issue down at the foot/ankle level is foolish in this case. Stretching this calf day after day until aliens come visit earth will still not be enough stretch time to fix this premature heel rise (ie. get that heel to stay down longer). There is a good reason why this is happening in this person, and it is a neurologic one, one we will discuss on the Patreon site for our Patrons. And, the reason does not matter for the concept I am teaching here today.

For today, you need to be able to see premature heel rise, and know all of the issues behind it, including causes, so that you can direct your phyiscial examination to solve your client's puzzle.
I have included yesterday's post below so you can review and bring this further together.
This is the kind of stuff we will do at Dr. Allen's Friday night Gait Lab, over some beverages. A unique, clinically curious and hungry 25 people need only apply. If you want to get to the next level of your human movement game, this is a way to get there.

Yesterday's post: We know that early/premature heel rise (PHR) leads to premature loading of the forefoot.
We know that premature heel rise (PHR) speeds us through many of the timely mechanical events that need and should occur for to get to safe and effective toe off during walking and running gaits.
This is why there are so many variables that need to be assessed and checked before instituting care to address the premature heel rise, because many times the problem is not even near the heel.
Consider, examine, assess (this is not an exhaustive list either) of causes of PHR
-short calf complex
-short quad (limits hip extension)
- short hip flexors
-anterior pelvis tilt as one's deviated norm posture
- prolonged or excessive rearfoot inversion
-lack of appropriate pronation (sustained supination)
-hallux limitus, rigidus
- weak anterior compartment lower leg
-lack of hip extension/weak glutes
-knee flexion contracture
- neurologic (toe walking gait from youth)
-painful achilles tendon mechanism
- loss of ankle rocker (which has its own long list)
. . . . to name a few

This is why you need to examine your clients, even after a gait analysis. Because, as we like to say, what you see is not your clients gait problem, it is their work around to other mechanical deficits.
After all, telling someone they just need to lengthen/stretch their calf to keep that heel down longer is utterly foolish.

*want to learn more about this stuff, you can join the upcoming Dr. Allen, Friday night Gait Lab series that he will be having in his office one Friday a month, in his Chicagoland office. Stay tuned for that notice. I will take only 25 people per session. We will dive into videos, cases, concepts, white-board rabbit holes, and enjoy some beverages and learn together. Stay tuned. The first 25 to pay and sign up are in !

Shawn Allen, the other gait guy

#gait, #gaitproblems, #gaitanalysis, #heelrise, #PHR, #prematureheelrise, #achilles, #achillestendinitis, #anklerocker, #heelrocker, #forefootpain, #halluxlimitus, #halluxrigidus, #heelpain

Premature heel rise: Part 1

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We know that early/premature heel rise (PHR) leads to premature loading of the forefoot.
We know that premature heel rise (PHR) speeds us through many of the timely mechanical events that need and should occur for to get to safe and effective toe off during walking and running gaits.
This is why there are so many variables that need to be assessed and checked before instituting care to address the premature heel rise, because many times the problem is not even near the heel.
Consider, examine, assess (this is not an exhaustive list either) of causes of PHR
-short calf complex
-short quad (limits hip extension)
- short hip flexors
-anterior pelvis tilt as one's deviated norm posture
- prolonged or excessive rearfoot inversion
-lack of appropriate pronation (sustained supination)
-hallux limitus, rigidus
- weak anterior compartment lower leg
-lack of hip extension/weak glutes
-knee flexion contracture
- neurologic (toe walking gait from youth)
-painful achilles tendon mechanism
- loss of ankle rocker (which has its own long list)
. . . . to name a few

This is why you need to examine your clients, even after a gait analysis. Because, as we like to say, what you see is not your clients gait problem, it is their work around to other mechanical deficits.
After all, telling someone they just need to lengthen/stretch their calf to keep that heel down longer is utterly foolish.

*want to learn more about this stuff, you can join the upcoming Dr. Allen, Friday night Gait Lab series that he will be having in his office one Friday a month, in his Chicagoland office. Stay tuned for that notice. I will take only 25 people per session. We will dive into videos, cases, concepts, white-board rabbit holes, and enjoy some beverages and learn together. Stay tuned. The first 25 to pay and sign up are in !

Shawn Allen, the other gait guy

#gait, #gaitproblems, #gaitanalysis, #heelrise, #PHR, #prematureheelrise, #achilles, #achillestendinitis, #anklerocker, #heelrocker, #forefootpain, #halluxlimitus, #halluxrigidus, #heelpain

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Do you know where your rocker is?

At 1st pass, some articles may seem like a sleeper, but there can be some great clinical pearls to be had. I recently ran across one of these. It was a presentation from the  42nd annual American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists meeting in Orlando, March 2016 entitled “ Shifting Position of Shoe Heel Rocker Affects Ankle Mechanics During Gait”. The title caught my eye.

They looked at ankle kinematics while keeping the toe portion of rocker constant at 63% of foot length, angled at 25 degrees and shifting the base of a rockered shoe from 1cm behind the medial malleolus, directly under it and 1cm anterior to it. Knee and hip kinematics did not differ significantly, however ankle range of motion did.

The more forward the ankle rocker, the less plantarflexion but more ankle dorsiflexion at midstance. So, the question begs, why do we care? Lets explore that further…

  • Think about the “average” heel rocker in a shoe. It largely has to do with the length of the heel and heel flare (base) of the shoe. The further back this is (ie; the more “flare”) the more plantar flexion at heel strike and less ankle dorsiflexion (and thus ankle rocker, as described HERE) you will see. Since loss of ankle dorsiflexion (ie: rocker) usually means a loss of hip extension (since these 2 things should be relatively equal during gait (see here), and that combination can be responsible for a whole host of problems that we talk about here on the blog all the time. Picking a shoe with a heel rocker based further forward (having less of a flare) would stand to promote more ankle dorsiflexion.
  • Having a shoe with a greater amount of “drop” from heel to toe (ie: ramp delta) is going to have the same effect. It will move the calcaneus forward with respect to the heel of the shoe and effectively move the rocker posteriorly.
  • Lastly, look a the shape of the outsole of the shoe. The toe drop is usually clear to see, but does it have a heel rocker (see the picture above)?

These are  a few examples of what to look for in a clients shoe when examining theirs or making a recommendation, depending on whether you are trying to improve or decrease ankle rocker. We can’t think of why you would want to decrease ankle rocker, but with conditions like rigid hallux limitus, where the person has limited or no dorsiflexion of the great toe, you may want to employ a rockered sole shoe. We would recommend one with the rocker set more forward.

This is apparently a growing thing, INTERVAL walking. Oy. We are not particular fans at this point, nothing exciting or earth shattering at this point (other than the concerns we hi light below) but we will look into it more.
What you need to see, and be aware of, is that this is what happens when you wear a shoe that has too soft a rear foot. At heel strike, instead of progressing forward into the mid and forefoot, the rear foot of the shoe deforms and forces you into more HEEL rocker, sustained heel rocker. If you stay in heel rocker too long, you won’t progress forward into ANKLE rocker (ankle dorsiflexion). This often causes knee hyperextension. If you have a good trained eye, you will see both of these things, prolonged heel rocker and never any ankle rocker/ankle dorsiflexion. IT is like the ankle in this video is frozen at 90 degrees the entire time, train your eye to see this absense of ankle rocker. This will cause premature heel rise and premature posterior compartment contraction which can cause premature forefoot loading. This is what happens when the heel of the shoe is too soft. A perfect example of “more cushion” is not always better. IT can be a liability as well. Remember the angry revolution over the MBT shoe and its mushy rear foot?. Same principle, same risks and concerns. Welcome to round two of the same old problems ????? Maybe. you decide. To be clear, this is a comment on the shoes being used, the technique is , well, perhaps interesting. That is all we are willing to comment on at this point until we look into it more. Look at the heel and ankle mechanics during the slow mo clips.
Sorry Ben Greenfield. We are not impressed, as of yet. We like your podcast Ben, you are doing us all a great service, but this one is promoting some potential problems that people need to know about.
Start with our “Shuffle Walk”. Google search it under the Gait Guys. That is a good start.

- Dr. Allen

Gait Cycle Basics: Part 3

As Promised: The Rockers…

According to Perry, progression of gait over the supporting foot depends on 3 functional rockers

heel rocker: the heel is the fulcrum as the foot rolls into plantar flexion. The pretibial muscles eccentrically contract to decelerate the foot drop and pull the tibia forward

 

ankle rocker: the ankle is the fulcrum and the tibia rolls forward due to forward momentum. The soleus eccentrically contracts to decelerate the forward progression of the tibia over the talus. Ankle and forefoot rocker can be compromised by imbalances in strength and length of the gastroc/soleus group and anterior compartment muscles.

 

forefoot rocker: tibial progression continues and the gastroc/soleus groups contract to decelerate the rate of forward limb movement. This, along with forward momentum, passive tension in the posterior compartment muscles, active contraction of the posterior compartment and windlass effect of the plantar fascia results in heel lift.

Now see if you can pick out the rockers in today’s video.

The Gait Guys… We are everywhere!!