The top 6 reasons we like hills for training ankle rocker and hip extension

image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Caer_Caradoc_hill.jpg

image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Caer_Caradoc_hill.jpg

1. Hills do not cost money and are almost always readily available : )

2. Being outside is good for your health

3. Hills do not pull the hip into extension and place a stretch (pull) on the anterior hip musculature including the rectus femoris, iliopsoas and iliacus. This causes a slow stretch of the muscle, activating the muscle spindles (Ia afferents) and causing a muscle contraction via the stretch reflex. This will inhibit the posterior compartment of hip extensors (especially the glute max) through reciprocal inhibition, making it difficult to fire them.

4. A hill does not force your knee into extension, eliciting a stretch reflex in the hamstrings like a treadmill does

5. A hill naturally puts the ankle into dorsiflexion, and, along with active pulling up of the toes, helps you to get more into your anterior compartment and eliminates the tendency of the ankle being pulled into dorsiflexion (like with a treadmill) which would initiate a stretch reflex in the gastroc/soleus and long flexors.

6. The increased hip flexor requirement of going uphill gives you more opportunity to engage the abs before the psoas and rectus femoris/TFL and on the stance phase leg, you can get an increased stretch of those muscles

Tips for picking the right hill and using it to your advantage

  • When just starting out, try and pick an incline that does not exceed the ankle dorsiflexion available to the patient/client

  • It’s OK if it’s uncomfortable, but not if its painful

  • Concentrate on pulling up the toes and dorsiflexing the ankle

  • Squeeze your glute at heel strike and toe off

  • leave your stance phase heel on the ground as long as possible

  • Place your hands on your abs and concentrate on activating them PRIOR to flexing your hip

Dr Ivo Waerlop, one of The Gait Guys

#walkinghills #traininganklerocker #thegaitguys # increasinghipextension



Building a Better Bridge

Using bridge exercises? Want to make it more effective? Here's one simple way: bend the weight bearing knee to 135 degrees rather than the traditional 90. It preferentially activates the g max and med more (relatively, compared to the hamstring ; the actual values for the max and med remained similar) and the hamstring significantly less (24% vs 75%)

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CONCLUSION:

"Modifying the traditional single-leg bridge by flexing the active knee to 135 ° instead of 90 ° minimizes hamstring activity while maintaining high levels of gluteal activation, effectively building a bridge better suited for preferential gluteal activation.

 

Lehecka BJ, Edwards M, Haverkamp R, et al. BUILDING A BETTER GLUTEAL BRIDGE: ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HIP MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG BRIDGES. International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy. 2017;12(4):543-549.

link to free full text: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5534144/

Building a better Bridge: Part 2

Along the same vein as our last post, consider abducting the leg 30 degrees, which increases gluteus maximus activity, lessens anterior pelvic tilt and lessens erector spinae activity. Of course, pelvic tilt should have clued you in to a weak core in the 1st place : )

PURPOSE: To investigate how the erector spinae (ES) and gluteus maximus (GM) muscle activity and the anterior pelvic tilt angle change with different hip abduction angles during a bridging exercise.

METHODS: Twenty healthy participants (10 males and 10 females, aged 21.6 ± 1.6) voluntarily participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the ES and GM during bridging at three hip abduction angles: 0°, 15°, and 30°. Simultaneously, the anterior pelvic tilt angle was measured using Image J software.

RESULTS: The EMG amplitude of the GM muscle and the GM/ES EMG ratio were greatest at 30° hip abduction, followed by 15° and then 0° hip abduction during the bridging exercise. In contrast, the ES EMG amplitude at 30° hip abduction was significantly lesser than that at 0° and 15° abduction. Additionally, the anterior pelvic tilt angle was significantly lower at 30° hip abduction than at 0° or 15°.

CONCLUSIONS: Bridging with 30° hip abduction can be recommended as an effective method to selectively facilitate GM muscle activity, minimize compensatory ES muscle activity, and decrease the anterior pelvic tilt angle.

Kang SY1, Choung SD2, Jeon HS3. Modifying the hip abduction angle during bridging exercise can facilitate gluteus maximus activity. Man Ther. 2016 Apr;22:211-5. doi: 10.1016/j.math.2015.12.010. Epub 2016 Jan 2.

 

Gaining Anterior Length, Through Posterior Strength. A Lesson in Reciprocal Inhibition

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Gaining Anterior Length, Through Posterior Strength and vice versa….A Lesson in Reciprocal Inhibition

I found a really cool article, quite by accident. I was leafing through an older copy of one of, if not my favorite Journals “Lower Extremity Review” and there it was. An article entitled “Athletes with hip flexor tightness have reduced gluteus maximus activation”. Wow, I thought! Now there is a great article on reciprocal inhibition! This reminded me of a piece we wrote some time ago

What is reciprocal inhibition, also called “reciprocal innervation” you ask? The concept, was 1st observed as early as 1626 by Rene Descartes though observed in the 19th century, was not fully understood and accepted until it earned a Nobel prize for its creditor, Sir Charles Sherrington, in 1932.

Simply put, when a muscle contracts, its antagonist is neurologically inhibited (see the diagram above) When your hip flexors contract, your hip extensors are inhibited. This holds true whether you actively contract the muscle or if the muscle is irritated in some manner, causing contraction. The reflex has to do with muscle spindles and Type I and Type II afferents which I have covered in an article I wrote some time ago.

We can (and often do) take advantage of this concept with treating the bellies of hip flexors (iliopsoas, tensor fascia lata, rectus femoris, iliacus, iliocapsularis) and extensors (gluteus maximus, posterior fibers of gluteus medius). This is especially important in folks with low back pain, as they often have increased psoas activity and cross sectional area, especially in the presence of degenerative changes.

There also appears to be a correlation between decreased hip extension and low back pain, with a difference of as little as 10 degrees being significant. Take the time to do a thorough history and exam and pay attention to hip extension and ankle dorsiflexion as they should be the same, with at least 10 degrees seeming to be the “clinical” minimum. Since the psoas should only fire at the end of terminal stance/preswing and into early swing, problems begin to arise when it fires for longer periods.

Can you see now how taking advantage of reciprocal inhibition can improve your outcomes? Even something as simple as taping the gluteus can have a positive effect! Try this today or this week in the clinic, not only with your patients hip flexors, but with all muscle groups, always thinking about agonist/antagonist relationships.




In the moment: Sports medicine  Jordana Bieze Foster: Athletes with hip flexor tightness have reduced gluteus maximus activation  Lower Extremity review Vol 6, Number 7 2014

https://tmblr.co/ZrRYjx1VG3KYy

Mills M, Frank B, Blackburn T, et al. Effect of limited hip flexor length on gluteal activation during an overhead squat in female soccer players. J Athl Train 2014;49(3 Suppl):S-83.

Ciuffreda KJ, Stark L.  Descartes’ law of reciprocal innervation. Am J Optom Physiol Opt. 1975 Oct;52(10):663-73.
Jacobson M Foundations of Neuroscience Springer Science and Business Media, Plenum Press, NY 1993 p 277

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1932/sherrington-bio.html

https://thegaitguys.tumblr.com/post/9708399904/ah-yes-the-ia-and-type-ii-afferents-one-of-our

Arbanas J, Pavlovic I, Marijancic V, et al MRI features of the psoas major muscle in patients with low back pain. Eur Spine J. 2013 Sep;22(9):1965-71. doi: 10.1007/s00586-013-2749-x. Epub 2013 Mar 31.

Roach SM, San Juan JG, Suprak DN, Lyda M, Bies AJ, Boydston CR. Passive hip range of motion is reduced in active subjects with chronic low back pain compared to controls. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2015 Feb;10(1):13-20. Erratum in: Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2015 Aug;10(4):572.

Paatelma M Karvonen E Heiskanen J Clinical perspective: how do clinical test results differentiate chronic and subacute low back pain patients from “non‐patients”? J Man Manip Ther. 2009;17(1):11‐19.[PMC free article] [PubMed]

Evans K Refshauge KM Adams R Aliprandi L Predictors of low back pain in young adult golfers: a preliminary study. Phys Ther Sports. 2005;6:122‐130.

Mellin G Correlations of hip mobility with degree of back pain and lumbar spinal mobility in chronic low‐back pain patients. Spine. June 1988;13(6):668‐670. [PubMed]

Lewis CL, Ferris DP. Walking with Increased Ankle Pushoff Decreases Hip Muscle Moments. Journal of biomechanics. 2008;41(10):2082-2089. doi:10.1016/j.jbiomech.2008.05.013.

Nodehi-Moghadam A, Taghipour M, Goghatin Alibazi R, Baharlouei H. The comparison of spinal curves and hip and ankle range of motions between old and young persons. Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran. 2014;28:74.

Daniel Moon , MD, MS; Alberto Esquenazi , MD Instrumented Gait Analysis: A Tool in the Treatment of Spastic Gait Dysfunction JBJS Reviews, 2016 Jun; 4 (6): e1. http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.RVW.15.00076

Kilbreath SL, Perkins S, Crosbie J, McConnell J. Gluteal taping improves hip extension during stance phase of walking following stroke. Aust J Physiother. 2006;52(1):53-6.

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Abs on the UP, Glutes on the DOWN

I had the opportunity to go on my 1st mountain bike ride of the season last Sunday morning. Yes, I am aware it is JUNE, but the snow has finally melted (we had over 7 FEET at arapahoe Basin in May) and you need to understand that I am usually a runner). In the cool morning 44 degree air I was reminded of the importance of my gluteal muscles (rather than just my quads) while climbing a technical hill which was clearly pushing my aerobic capacity. We have the opportunity to perform many bike fits in the office and treat many cycling ailments. We also train and retraing pedal stroke and one of our mantras (in addition to skill, endurance and strength) is “Glutes on the downstroke; Abs on the upstroke”. Meaning use your glutes to extend the hip from 12 to 6 o’clock and use your abs to initiate the upstroke. Quadricep (on the downtstroke) and hamstring dominance (on the upstroke) is something we see often and this mantra often proves useful in the “retraining process”.

I have been a fan of Ed Burkes work (“Serious Cycling” and “Competitive Cycling”) for years and have read (and lectured about) these books many times. In my effort to find a basis in the literature for my mantra, I ran across a paper (1) that seemed to substantiate, at least in part, the mantra. It is a small study looked at elite athletes that explores changes that occur in muscle recruitment as the body fatigues after a sub maximal exercise session.

Their conclusion “The large increases in activity for gluteus maximus and biceps femoris, which are in accordance with the increase in force production during the propulsive phase, could be considered as instinctive coordination strategies that compensate for potential fatigue and loss of force of the knee extensors (i.e., vastus lateralis and vastus medialis) by a higher moment of the hip extensors.”

This makes sense, although may be contradicted by this study (2), which showed LESS gluteal activity at higher mechanical efficiency, with increased tricep surae activity. They conclude “These findings imply that cycling at 55%-60% V˙O(2max) will maximize the rider’s exposure to high efficient muscle coordination and kinematics.”  Although this study looks at mechanical efficiency and the 1st lloks at muscle activity.

Being seated on a bike and having your torso, as well as hips flexed is not the most mechanically efficient posture for driving the glutes, but clinical observation seems to dictate that the less quad and hamstring dominant people are on the down and up stroke respectively, then the more pain free they are. This does not always equte to being the fastest, but it does equate to fewer injuries showing up in the office.

  1. Dorel S1, Drouet JM, Couturier A, Champoux Y, Hug F. Changes of pedaling technique and muscle coordination during an exhaustive exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Jun;41(6):1277-86. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31819825f8.
  2. Blake OM1, Champoux Y, Wakeling JM.  Muscle coordination patterns for efficient cycling. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 May;44(5):926-38. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182404d4b.

Shoe lacing problems, things you need to know (that you don't).

How you lace your shoes does truly matter (according to this study).
We have talked about shoe lacing on more than one occasion. Everyone has played around with different laces and lacing strategies at one time or another. And, every shoe seems to lace just a little differently. Some shoes lace far into the forefoot, some have the potential to lace high up into the ankle.  But just because there are eyelets there, doesn’t mean  you have to thread a lace through the hole. It is about fit the majority of the time.  Some of our runners will use “skip” lacing to avoid pressure over the dorsum of the foot, especially if they have a saddle exostosis or hot tendon in that area, much of the time this works to alleviate the pain and pressure there. Just remember, impaired ankle rocker often via weakness of the anterior compartment muscles (toe extensors, tibialis anterior, peroneus tertius) will force dorsiflexion moments into the midfoot and can cause some joint-related compressive pressure on the dorsal foot which can seemingly (and mistakenly) come from shoes tied too tight across the top of the foot. Be sure to consider this fact before you “skip lace” your shoes, it is a big player, one we see all of the time.
In today’s journal article found below, we discover some other factors in a controlled study.  Here they look into the effects of lacing on biomechanics in running, specifically rearfoot runners. The results of the study showed reduced loading rates and pronation velocities as well as lowest peak pressures under the heel and lateral midfoot in the tightest and highest laced shoes. Whereas, the lower laced shoes resulted in lower impacts and lower peak pressures under the 3rd and 4th metatarsal heads (they proposed that this was from forward foot slide in the shoe because of this lacing). The study authors concluded 

 A firm foot-to-shoe coupling with higher lacing leads to a more effective use of running shoe features and is likely to reduce the risk of lower limb injury.

Remember, this is just data for you to cogitate over. It can help you work through some possible issues with your feet and your sport, however it does not translate to everyone as a standard protocol. Remember this, we have been known to say, “your problem is not often the shoe, it is the thing in the shoe (you and your faulty biomechanics)”. However, blaming your problems on you is not good shoe manufacturer advertising, so many shoe companies will offer a plethora of shoes choices for you to accommodate to your variables. This does not necessarily mean the problem is solved, rather it is often managed by a “better” shoe choice that seems to work for your variables. This is a good thing most of the time, if you understand shoes, shoe anatomy, and human anatomy (foot types) so that you can pair them up for a best outcome. The problem may lie in the fact that your shoe fitter is not likely to have all of the necessary pieces to put your perfectly matched picture together, including understanding your total body biomechanics and possibly understanding why a weak glute is impairing hip extension and thus limiting ankle rocker motion, causing premature heel rise, and thus forcing too much dorsiflexion into the arch of the foot and premature forefoot loading causing what seems to be too tightly tied shoes.  
What we truly need an e-Harmony for matching shoes and feet ! But since that perfect scenario doesn’t often exist at the shoe store level or gait analysis level, here at The Gait Guys we have put together the next best thing, The National Shoe Fit Certification Program if you care to take this all to the next level. 
Shoe fitting is an art, and lacing is just another paint brush you can  use to get the job done. You just have to know what brush to use for each given piece of art (ie. the athlete). 
Shawn and Ivo, The gait guys
J Sports Sci. 2009 Feb 1;27(3):267-75. doi: 10.1080/02640410802482425.

Effects of different shoe-lacing patterns on the biomechanics of running shoes.

 

The One Cheek Sneak and Your Gait.  

 Yup. You know what we are talking about.    Out gassing. Passing gas. Trouser coughing. Flatulating (is that a word?) Tooting. Farting.. Call it what you like. Exemplified by Shinta Cho’s classic “The Gas We Pass”. The question is, why is it relevant to gait? 
 If you have followed us for any length of time, you know how important we think the glutes are.    We have many posts and blog articles on their importance and exercises to strengthen them.    The problem is, when most people do them, they THINK they are contracting their glutes (and some are) BUT they are ALSO contracting their (external anal) sphincter (for you neuro nerds,    the internal sphincter is  no t under voluntary control). This results in gas retention, which may cause a stomach ache, or in rare instances, distention of the bowel. Chances are, when    you relax, it will come out then (yes, you fart in your sleep, as your bedfellow for an honest answer !). 
   Try this.   Sit down and and contract your glutes and your external sphincter. Now try and contract your external sphincter, ONLY. Contracting the external sphincter also engages the pelvic floor. Not necessarily something you need to do (unless you are treating an incontinence issue but then again that more recently under hot debate, here read our blog post here for some truths and myths on this topic) when running. OK, now just the glutes. You can palpate them (glutes only please) to make sure they are contracting. You are now experiencing isolation of the individual muscles. You should be able to access them individually, as well as together. For an added challenge in your powers of isolation, you can then try this exercise after consuming beans (as you flog your gut with their poisonous lectins) , to test your true abilities. 
 There are other related issues here to consider, one is the Kegal exercise. As we mentioned in  another blog post (link here):  
  “A Kegel attempts to strengthen the pelvic floor, but it really only continues to pull the sacrum inward promoting even more weakness, and more PF (pelvic floor) gripping. The     muscles that balance out the anterior pull on the sacrum are the glutes. A lack of glutes (having no butt) is what makes this group so much more susceptible to pelvic floor disorder (PFD). Zero lumbar curvature (missing the little curve at the small of the back) is the most [we would chose to say a nicely speculative] telling sign that the pelvic floor is beginning to weaken.   An easier way to say this is: Weak glutes + too many Kegels = PFD.”-Nicole Crawford (1)  
  Many exercises are designed to help train your nervous system and create a new motor pattern, in addition to strengthening and or creating endurance in the targeted muscles.      Your external sphincter probably has plenty of strength and endurance.  

   The Gait Guys.  Bringing you the relevance in the seemingly irrelevant. All Gait; All the time…   

  1.  Here is Crawford’s article link.  
  http://breakingmuscle.com/womens-fitness/stop-doing-kegels-real-pelvic-floor-advice-women-and-men  
  All material copyright 2013 The Gait Guys/ The Homunculus Group. All rights reserved. We have Lee and know how to use him

The One Cheek Sneak and Your Gait.

Yup. You know what we are talking about.  Out gassing. Passing gas. Trouser coughing. Flatulating (is that a word?) Tooting. Farting.. Call it what you like. Exemplified by Shinta Cho’s classic “The Gas We Pass”. The question is, why is it relevant to gait?

If you have followed us for any length of time, you know how important we think the glutes are.  We have many posts and blog articles on their importance and exercises to strengthen them.  The problem is, when most people do them, they THINK they are contracting their glutes (and some are) BUT they are ALSO contracting their (external anal) sphincter (for you neuro nerds,  the internal sphincter is not under voluntary control). This results in gas retention, which may cause a stomach ache, or in rare instances, distention of the bowel. Chances are, when  you relax, it will come out then (yes, you fart in your sleep, as your bedfellow for an honest answer !).

Try this. Sit down and and contract your glutes and your external sphincter. Now try and contract your external sphincter, ONLY. Contracting the external sphincter also engages the pelvic floor. Not necessarily something you need to do (unless you are treating an incontinence issue but then again that more recently under hot debate, here read our blog post here for some truths and myths on this topic) when running. OK, now just the glutes. You can palpate them (glutes only please) to make sure they are contracting. You are now experiencing isolation of the individual muscles. You should be able to access them individually, as well as together. For an added challenge in your powers of isolation, you can then try this exercise after consuming beans (as you flog your gut with their poisonous lectins) , to test your true abilities.

There are other related issues here to consider, one is the Kegal exercise. As we mentioned in another blog post (link here):

“A Kegel attempts to strengthen the pelvic floor, but it really only continues to pull the sacrum inward promoting even more weakness, and more PF (pelvic floor) gripping. The muscles that balance out the anterior pull on the sacrum are the glutes. A lack of glutes (having no butt) is what makes this group so much more susceptible to pelvic floor disorder (PFD). Zero lumbar curvature (missing the little curve at the small of the back) is the most [we would chose to say a nicely speculative] telling sign that the pelvic floor is beginning to weaken. An easier way to say this is: Weak glutes + too many Kegels = PFD.”-Nicole Crawford (1)

Many exercises are designed to help train your nervous system and create a new motor pattern, in addition to strengthening and or creating endurance in the targeted muscles.  Your external sphincter probably has plenty of strength and endurance.

The Gait Guys.  Bringing you the relevance in the seemingly irrelevant. All Gait; All the time…

 1. Here is Crawford’s article link.

http://breakingmuscle.com/womens-fitness/stop-doing-kegels-real-pelvic-floor-advice-women-and-men

All material copyright 2013 The Gait Guys/ The Homunculus Group. All rights reserved. We have Lee and know how to use him

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A Window into the Glutes: Anatomy lesson for the day.

 

A rather literal statement for a rather literal picture. Taken from the Human Body Exhibit at the Denver Museum of Science, this picture offers us a glimpse into, or in this case through, one of our favorite muscle groups. This group that we see here, is probably our second favorite group. They are often called the “deep six” and are the deep hip external rotators. If you count, you will notice there are only five….one remains unseen the obturator internus. More on that later.

 

See the linear white lines on the right of the window? That’ s the two portions of the sciatic nerve. Notice how it runs under the muscle at the top and over the others? The muscle it runs under is the famous piriformis. When this muscle gets tight, it can impinge the sciatic nerve, causing pain down the leg (known as sciatica). This represents one of many causes of pain radiating down the leg.

 

The next muscle south is the gemelli superior, then the obturator externus, gemelli inferior, and quadratus femoris. The sixth of the deep six is the obturator internus, which runs from the inside of the pelvis on the obtrobturator foramen (those huge “eyes” you see in an x ray when looking at a pelvis from the front) to a similar place on the femur.

 

A few observations you should make.

 

  • when someone chews your butt off, or chews you a new one, this picture gives it a whole new meaning

  • the sciatic nerve runs under the piriformis
  • The top (superior) five muscles have a tendonous insertion to the femur that you can see as a whitish area on the left

  • the last (or most inferior muscle) has a muscular insertion to the femur (which is a reddish area on the left)
  • the positioning of these muscles allows them to be external rotators of the femur when the foot is in the air

  • when the foot is planted, they become external rotators of the pelvis or can act to slow internal rotation of the femur during stance phase
  • as you proceed caudally, the muscles become stronger adductors of the thigh

 

We will see this post as a reference for some future posts on this most fascinating muscle groups. Until then, study up!

 

The Gait Guys. Uber Foot Geeks. Join us in our mission to educate the world on the importance of understanding human motion and its impact on translating us forward in the gravitational plane.

 

 

all material copyright 2013 The Gait Guys/ The Homunculus Group. All rights reserved

READY

Great Gait: You don’t see this that often

Great gait brought to our attention by one our readers; one his questions was how he had such great “kick back” traveling at the speed he was traveling at. 

 

Here is an efficient gait:  note he mid foot strikes (you may need to watch it a few times to see it) close to under body and does not over stride; he has great hip extension, and a forward lean at the ankles; even arm swing (note elbows do not go forward of and wrists do not go behind body). It all adds up!

So what causes such great hip extension? Largely 2 factors: forward momentum and glute (all 3; max, med and min) activation. From the last post and EMG studies, we know the glute max contracts at initial contact (foot stance) through loading response (beginning of mid support) and then again at toe off to give a last “burst”; the gluteus medius and minimus contract during most of stance phase. initially to initiate internal rotation of the femur (a requisite for hip extension);  the former to keep the pelvis level and assist in extension and external rotation during the last half of stance phase to assist in supination and creating a rigid lever to push off of. This is, of course, assisted by the opposite leg in swing phase.

Forward lean and momentum move the axis of rotation of the hip behind the center of gravity, assisting the glute max to extend and prepare the lower limb for the bust at push off. The stance limb, now in external rotation, makes it easier to access the sacral (especially) and iliac fibers of the glute max and the posterior fibers of the gluteus medius.

What a orchestration of biomechanics resulting here, in a symphony of beautiful movement.

The Gait Guys. Bringing you great gait, when available…..

Beautiful Glutes: Part 2     
 We are going to get a little techie here. Hang in there! 

   EMG data   
 There are a paucity of studies on gluteal function during gait, but here is what is out there. 
 The upper and lower portions of the glute max shows activity at initial contact and near the end of swing phase, the middle portion additionally just before and after pre-swing.  The glute max does not appear to be a postural control muscle, nor is it utilized in static one leg standing, except when a large load is imposed  When the center of gravity of the whole body is grossly shifted, the gluteus maximus becomes engaged. The glute max, along with the vasti also assist in deceleration of the body during the first half of stance. 
 The gluteus medius and minimus appear to play a much more substantial role in propulsion and stabilization during normal gait, contracting from terminal swing to preswing, maximally during early midstance, to prevent contralateral drop of the pelvis. The anterior fibers of both appear important for gait, as they assist the external obliques in forward progression of the pelvis on the side oppposite the stance phase leg, in addition to supplying coronal plane stabilization. A brief burst of activity in midswing assists in medial rotation of the thigh. Gluteus maximus fuction can be affected by    altered biomechanics and the g   luteus medius commonly affected by postural faults. 
 Wow, betcha didn’t know that! Stay tuned for part 3! 
 We remain…The Gait Guys.

Beautiful Glutes: Part 2

We are going to get a little techie here. Hang in there!

EMG data

There are a paucity of studies on gluteal function during gait, but here is what is out there.

The upper and lower portions of the glute max shows activity at initial contact and near the end of swing phase, the middle portion additionally just before and after pre-swing.  The glute max does not appear to be a postural control muscle, nor is it utilized in static one leg standing, except when a large load is imposed  When the center of gravity of the whole body is grossly shifted, the gluteus maximus becomes engaged. The glute max, along with the vasti also assist in deceleration of the body during the first half of stance.

The gluteus medius and minimus appear to play a much more substantial role in propulsion and stabilization during normal gait, contracting from terminal swing to preswing, maximally during early midstance, to prevent contralateral drop of the pelvis. The anterior fibers of both appear important for gait, as they assist the external obliques in forward progression of the pelvis on the side oppposite the stance phase leg, in addition to supplying coronal plane stabilization. A brief burst of activity in midswing assists in medial rotation of the thigh. Gluteus maximus fuction can be affected by  altered biomechanics and the g luteus medius commonly affected by postural faults.

Wow, betcha didn’t know that! Stay tuned for part 3!

We remain…The Gait Guys.